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Techno's Grammartastic Grammar Gathering

September 20, 2017 by Technotoad64
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Techno's Grammartastic Grammar Gathering

Technotoad64
September 20, 2017


Introduction

"Do you want to write correctly? Do you want to stop being a joke? Then you came to the right place! TGGG is going to save you!"

Techno's Grammartastic Grammar Gathering

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Introduction
It's the T Triple-G.

This is a list of various grammatical rules, so that you can learn how to speak in an educative, professional manner when writing guides, forum posts, etc. (Grammatical correctness, believe it or not, plays a large role in how your audience perceives you.)

If you're unsure how to use these rules, leave a comment and I will elaborate.




This guide's features

This guide features grammar and spelling rules that you may or may not have known about. Every time I find a frequently made mistake, I will add the rule being broken here, and an explanation of how it works.


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457 is the magic number
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Conjunctions



Conjunctions
"And", "but", and "or", will get you pretty far!

Conjunctions are words that join words or groups of words together. There are three types of conjunctions, which are:
  • Coordinating conjunctions, such as
    • and
    • but
    • or
    • nor
    • for
    • so
    • yet

  • Correlative conjunctions, such as
    • either/or
    • neither/nor
    • whether/or
    • not/but
    • not only/but also
    • both/and
    • no sooner/than

  • Subordinating conjunctions, such as
    • after
    • although
    • as
    • because
    • before
    • if
    • once
    • since
    • than
    • that
    • though
    • till
    • until
    • when
    • where
    • whether
    • while

Now, I will cover each group.


Coordinating Conjunctions

Coordinating conjunctions are used to join words, phrases, and independent clauses while giving them equal importance.


When joining individual words, use a comma in-between every item in a list. If you're only mentioning two things, don't use a comma at all. Note that the comma on the next-to-last thing listed is optional, and is called the Oxford comma.

Correct:
My favorite colors are red, green, and blue.
This chicken is bland and dry.
Feel free to include more power, CDR or penetration.

Incorrect:
My favorite colors are red, green, and, blue.
This chicken is bland, and dry.
Feel free to include more power CDR or penetration.


When joining phrases, follow the same rule as when joining individual words.

Correct:
Nothing can match the fiery colors of sunset, the melody of birds in the morning, or the scent of gravel after rain.
Moldy bread and expired milk should be thrown in the trash.
You can add more magical power, cooldown reduction or penetration.

Incorrect:
Nothing can match the fiery colors of sunset the melody of birds in the morning or the scent of gravel after rain.
Moldy bread, and expired milk should be thrown in the trash.
You can add more magical power, cooldown reduction, or, penetration.


When joining independent clauses, insert the conjunction in-between the clauses and add a comma before the conjunction. The Oxford comma does not apply here.

Correct:
We live thousands of miles away, and I may never see her face, yet she has stolen my heart.
I always add the salt before cooking the rice, so it dissolves more evenly.
This is your main source of damage, so level it first.

Incorrect:
We live thousands of miles away, and I may never see her face yet she has stolen my heart.
I always add the salt before cooking the rice so, it dissolves more evenly.
This is your main source of damage, so, level it first.



Correlative Conjunctions

Correlative conjunctions are used to join two balanced words, phrases, or clauses. Correlative conjunctions are always used in pairs, and the two elements that they connect are usually similar in length and grammatical structure.


A comma is not normally necessary between the two components of a correlative conjunction, though there are exceptions. A comma is necessary when it is used to either offset a nonrestrictive clause, or separate two independent clauses with a coordinating conjunction.

Correct:
I had no sooner found my passion than it became impossible to pursue.
Either follow directions, like you said you would, or get out of my kitchen.
Not only is Charge Prey your main engage, but it also works as an escape.

Incorrect:
I had no sooner found my passion, than it became impossible to pursue.
Either follow directions like you said you would or get out of my kitchen.
Not only is Charge Prey your main engage but it also works as an escape.


The verb which follows two subjects joined by "or" or "nor" must agree with the second subject, not the first.

Correct:
Neither the stillness of the pond nor the swans in flight match her beauty and grace.
Neither microwaves or a smoking waiter belongs in a restaurant.
Either the Mana buff or the Fire Imps need to be cleared as soon as you can.

Incorrect:
Neither the stillness of the pond nor the swans in flight matches her beauty and grace.
Neither microwaves or a smoking waiter belong in a restaurant.
Either the Mana buff or the Fire Imps needs to be cleared as soon as you can.



Subordinating Conjunctions

Coordinating conjunctions are used to join independent clauses to dependent clauses by providing a necessary transition between the two ideas in the sentence. Unlike coordinating or correlative conjunctions, subordinating conjunctions reduce the importance of one clause so that the reader understands which of the two ideas (specifically, the main clause) is more important.


Under normal circumstances, use a comma at the end of the dependent clause if it comes before the independent clause. If the independent clause comes before the dependent clause, don't use a comma at all.

Correct:
Though on the surface I appear an ordinary man, I am a master of my craft.
This cake is inedible because you burnt it to a crisp.
This ability is also an excellent objective-securing tool if timed correctly.

Incorrect:
Though on the surface I appear an ordinary man I am a master of my craft.
This cake is inedible, because you burnt it to a crisp.
This ability is also an excellent objective-securing tool, if timed correctly.


Things get a bit more complicated when the subordinate clause starts with a relative pronoun, which include which, who, whom, and whose. Sometimes you will need a comma, and sometimes you won't, depending on whether the clause is essential or nonessential. A clause is essential when it clarifies an otherwise general noun, which is a noun that does not refer to any specific object.

No comma needed:
I give my thanks to all the people whom have aided me throughout my life.
The entire kitchen reeks of the fish which you left unrefrigerated.
Sobek is good against gods who rely on healing.

Comma needed:
I give my thanks to my mother, who has aided me throughout my life.
The entire kitchen reeks of fish, which is unbearable.
Sobek is good against Aphrodite, who relies on her healing.

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