4 Votes
New Guide

Techno's Grammartastic Grammar Gathering

August 11, 2017 by Technotoad64
Comments: 35    |    Views: 912    |   




Techno's Grammartastic Grammar Gathering

Technotoad64
August 11, 2017


Introduction

"Do you want to write correctly? Do you want to stop being a joke? Then you came to the right place! TGGG is going to save you!"

Techno's Grammartastic Grammar Gathering

--
Introduction
It's the T Triple-G.

This is a list of various grammatical rules, so that you can learn how to speak in an educative, professional manner when writing guides, forum posts, etc. (Grammatical correctness, believe it or not, plays a large role in how your audience perceives you.)

If you're unsure how to use these rules, leave a comment and I will elaborate.




This guide's features

This guide features grammar and spelling rules that you may or may not have known about. Every time I find a frequently made mistake, I will add the rule being broken here, and an explanation of how it works.


-
-
-
-
-
-

Joining Phrases and Sentences

Quoted:
"Have you ever had a dream that you, um, you had, your, you, you could, you’ll do, you, you wants, you, you could do so, you , you’ll do, you could, you, you want, you want them, to do you so much, you could do anything?"

Joining Phrases and Sentences

--
By using conjunctions
"And", "but", and "or", will get you pretty far!

Conjunctions are words that join words or groups of words together. There are three types of conjunctions, which are:
  • Coordinating Conjunctions, such as
    • and
    • but
    • or
    • nor
    • for
    • so
    • yet

  • Correlative Conjunctions, such as
    • either/or
    • neither/nor
    • whether/or
    • not only/but also

  • Subordinating Conjunctions, such as
    • after
    • although
    • as
    • because
    • before
    • if
    • once
    • since
    • than
    • that
    • though
    • till
    • until
    • when
    • where
    • whether
    • while

Now, I will cover each group.


Coordinating Conjunctions

Coordinating Conjunctions are used to join individual words, phrases, and independent clauses.

When joining individual words, use a comma in-between every item in a list. If you're only mentioning two things, don't use a comma at all. Note that the comma on the next-to-last thing listed is optional, and is called the Oxford comma.

Correct:
My favorite colors are red, green, and blue.
This chicken is bland and dry.
Feel free to include more power, CDR or penetration.

Incorrect:
My favorite colors are red, green, and, blue.
This chicken is bland, and dry.
Feel free to include more power CDR or penetration.


When joining phrases, follow the same rule as when joining individual words.

Correct:
Nothing can match the fiery colors of sunset, the melody of birds in the morning, or the scent of gravel after rain.
Moldy bread and expired milk should be thrown in the trash.
You can add more magical power, cooldown reduction or penetration.

Incorrect:
Nothing can match the fiery colors of sunset the melody of birds in the morning or the scent of gravel after rain.
Moldy bread, and expired milk should be thrown in the trash.
You can add more magical power, cooldown reduction, or, penetration.


When joining independent clauses, insert the conjunction in-between the clauses and add a comma before the conjunction. The Oxford comma does not apply here.

Correct:
We live thousands of miles away, and I may never see her face, yet she has stolen my heart.
Add the salt before cooking the rice, so it dissolves more evenly.
This is your main source of damage, so level it first.

Incorrect:
We live thousands of miles away, and I may never see her face yet she has stolen my heart.
Add the salt before cooking the rice so, it dissolves more evenly.
This is your main source of damage, so, level it first.

Quick Comment (8) View Comments

You need to log in before commenting.

Newest Smite Gods

Quick Comment (8) View Comments

You need to log in before commenting.